Living (and writing about) the Law of Attraction!

cat-and-mouse“When animals are curious…the ‘feel-good’ neurotransmitter, dopamine is produced. Scientists used to believe the chemical itself caused the pleasure, until it was discovered that the chemical’s true purpose is to arouse a certain neural pathway. What actually feels good is the activation of the seeking portion of the brain…the most emotionally arresting part for any animal is the hunt not the catch.”

When I read this quote from THE INTENTION EXPERIMENT, by Lynne McTaggart (author of The Field), I was reminded, as Abraham-Hicks always says, that we never get it done.

Abraham also explains the purpose of our never-ending desires:

 “As you conclude a new desire, you summon life force…and whether you are allowing it to flow through you or not, All -That-Is benefits from that.”

 “You intended to come forth into the physical realm of contrast to define what is wanted, to connect with the energy that creates worlds, and to flow it toward your objects of attention. Not because the objects of attention are important, but because the act of flowing is essential to life.”

As I understand it, the purpose of desire is twofold:

  1. Contrast causes us to have preferences and as we determine what we want (by knowing what we don’t), our newly formed desire causes Source, of which we’re a part, to become more. When we ask it is  given. Source then becomes the vibrational equivalent of our desire, thereby causing the expansion of the Universe.
  2. The second purpose is to help us to focus.  As we focus on our desire, we can tell by our feelings where we are in relationship to it. Focus causes vibrational movement to or away from our object of desire. Deliberate movement toward our desire is life-giving. Why? Because in moving toward our desire we’re moving toward our Source, our Inner Being, God. Ultimately, it’s alignment that we truly want, and our day to day desires provide us with the impetus to seek that vibrational alignment as well as the evidence that we’ve attained it.

Growing up on a farm, I used to watch cats catch mice and then play with them endlessly, it seemed. They’d let them go, watch them run a few feet and catch them again. It seemed cruel and I’d think, “Just kill it already instead of torturing the poor thing.” But now as I imagine it from the cat’s perspective, I understand more clearly why they do this. It’s the same reason we’re set up the way we are. Why we keep having desires, why we experience contrast.

It’s the thrill of the hunt.

It’s the seeking and finding, the asking and receiving. It’s the not having and then seeing that first hint of evidence that brings us closer to our desire, the not knowing and then getting a whiff of the answer.

I’ve had many desires manifest, and I’ve noticed the satisfaction is often short-lived. There’s that sense of ”Okay, now what?” that inevitably follows. The ‘now what?’ is another desire, and another, and another. The thrill is in moving toward them not arriving.

Cats can teach us a lot of things. I’m learning that life is a game, and having fun is what it’s all about.

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